Author Topic: Condensed Practice  (Read 377 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jimjams

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Minator
  • ****
  • Posts: 978
  • Every note counts
Condensed Practice
« on: February 13, 2018, 10:45:13 PM »
You only have 20 minutes of practice time available. What do you do?
James
Musical artistry comes via a relentless pursuit of beauty.

Offline John Broecker

  • Time Traveler (Drummer)
  • MasterMeister
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,399
  • Reggae Musician Bob Marley.
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2018, 11:00:04 PM »
Practice harmonica techniques for 20 minutes.

JB
Believe it or not: DC Fontana was a Script Editor of Star Trek TV shows & movies; DJ Fontana was Elvis' drummer in the 1st 14 years of Elvis' career.

Offline The Lone Harper

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Tributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 487
  • New Chromatic Player
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2018, 11:20:41 PM »
Learn some harmonica test pieces such as Pete Pedersen's 'Pictures Of A Woman' that were intended to cover almost everything you can do on a chromatic along with posing a degree of difficulty. Once a player has pieces like that down pat they can run through them quite quickly and cover a wide range of techniques in the process. Another good piece is Tommy Reilly's 'Serenade'.
"Hi ho, Silver Concerto! Away!"

Offline jimjams

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Minator
  • ****
  • Posts: 978
  • Every note counts
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2018, 11:32:13 PM »
Practice harmonica techniques for 20 minutes.

JB
Which techniques?
James
Musical artistry comes via a relentless pursuit of beauty.

Offline jimjams

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Minator
  • ****
  • Posts: 978
  • Every note counts
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2018, 11:36:38 PM »
Learn some harmonica test pieces such as Pete Pedersen's 'Pictures Of A Woman' that were intended to cover almost everything you can do on a chromatic along with posing a degree of difficulty. Once a player has pieces like that down pat they can run through them quite quickly and cover a wide range of techniques in the process. Another good piece is Tommy Reilly's 'Serenade'.
Wow 😮 what a tune!

 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9vHg4PJ0gkI
James
Musical artistry comes via a relentless pursuit of beauty.

Online smojoe

  • MasterMeister
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,515
  • virgo
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2018, 11:57:45 PM »
While I will allow as how this piece is extremely difficult. I see the name as being a misnomer. A joke in fact. The name, not the piece. And whomsoever wrote it was trying to show all the things that could be done? with a chromo. So for that I give some latitude. 

BUT, this name is anything BUT resembling ANYthing like a woman. A woman is soft, smooth, they're the perfect shape Even a bit heavy or a bit light. They smell good. Even when they perspire. Their voice is softer, sweeter, more reserved. They are like living breathing angels. This piece is more like squirrels chasing each other through the treetops. All those squeeky chattering sounds. All that running all over the place. Notes bickering with each other. Jeez where did someone think that this name was proper. It's an insult.

'Antlers in the treetops' by who goosed the moose makes more sense to me. Just a personal feeling that I have held in for years. Time for me to be honest.

smo-joe   

Offline The Lone Harper

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Tributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 487
  • New Chromatic Player
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2018, 12:15:00 AM »
Learn some harmonica test pieces such as Pete Pedersen's 'Pictures Of A Woman' that were intended to cover almost everything you can do on a chromatic along with posing a degree of difficulty. Once a player has pieces like that down pat they can run through them quite quickly and cover a wide range of techniques in the process. Another good piece is Tommy Reilly's 'Serenade'.
Wow 😮 what a tune!

 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9vHg4PJ0gkI

I think Susan Sauter does it more justice:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0x27fVwR3S4
"Hi ho, Silver Concerto! Away!"

Offline jimjams

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Minator
  • ****
  • Posts: 978
  • Every note counts
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2018, 12:50:32 AM »
While I will allow as how this piece is extremely difficult. I see the name as being a misnomer. A joke in fact. The name, not the piece. And whomsoever wrote it was trying to show all the things that could be done? with a chromo. So for that I give some latitude. 

BUT, this name is anything BUT resembling ANYthing like a woman. A woman is soft, smooth, they're the perfect shape Even a bit heavy or a bit light. They smell good. Even when they perspire. Their voice is softer, sweeter, more reserved. They are like living breathing angels. This piece is more like squirrels chasing each other through the treetops. All those squeeky chattering sounds. All that running all over the place. Notes bickering with each other. Jeez where did someone think that this name was proper. It's an insult.

'Antlers in the treetops' by who goosed the moose makes more sense to me. Just a personal feeling that I have held in for years. Time for me to be honest.

smo-joe

"Antlers in the treetops' by who goosed the moose makes more sense to me. Just a personal feeling that I have held in for years."
ROFL!!
James
Musical artistry comes via a relentless pursuit of beauty.

Offline Keith

  • HELPER
  • Chrome-Meister
  • **
  • Posts: 1,328
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2018, 04:09:41 AM »
You only have 20 minutes of practice time available. What do you do?
As a beginner, (still), try to play tunes that I like & want to be able to play one day.  ;D

Getting better at it, I think, slowly, day by day, but then again, I don't want to rush this journey, as it's one of my hobbies.  8)

Online Age

  • A.J.Fedor
  • Administrator
  • MonsterMeister
  • *
  • Posts: 17,992
  • A.J. Fedor ><((((ļ>
    • A.J.'s mini-site
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2018, 01:39:38 PM »
"Antlers in the treetops' by who goosed the moose makes more sense to me. Just a personal feeling that I have held in for years." ROFL!!

Yeah, I remember those books; "Brown Spots on the Wall" By that Chinese novelist: Hu Flung Poo, "The Yellow Stream" by I.P.Daily,  "Smoke Rings in The Air" By Nick O.Teene, and a few others I don't wanna mention. ::)
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 01:53:22 PM by Age »
CONTACT A.J.Fedor with MeisterMail or click the MeisterMail globe on left

Offline mozharp

  • Chrome-Tributor
  • **
  • Posts: 461
  • Newbee
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2018, 01:44:23 PM »
Learn some harmonica test pieces such as Pete Pedersen's 'Pictures Of A Woman' that were intended to cover almost everything you can do on a chromatic along with posing a degree of difficulty. Once a player has pieces like that down pat they can run through them quite quickly and cover a wide range of techniques in the process. Another good piece is Tommy Reilly's 'Serenade'.

Where can one obtain the sheet music for these pieces?

Offline Doug

  • Chrome-Minator
  • ***
  • Posts: 502
  • Member
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2018, 05:58:14 PM »
I suppose youíre going to get a lot of different answers about this based on each personís temperament, character, and goals. If I only have 20 minutes or so to practice, I might play through all 12 major scales to start. I can do that now in roughly 5 minutes. Itís a great warmup for moving across the entire instrument, dealing with good embouchure and tone in every octave, moving cleanly from note to note, and getting my mind reconnected with where every note is. I might play through one or more of the Jazz scales (diminished, whole tone, Jazz melodic minor, etc.) to keep them fresh. Finally, Iíd pick one song of the half dozen or so in my current rotation and play through it for fun or maybe work on a section I have trouble with. I really enjoy scales, so itís not torture at all for me to play them. I know Iím locking in a solid foundation that I can draw from when reading or improvising, so the work has a rather large payoff. Anyway, that would be a good 20 minute practice for me that would be fun and productive. This is most likely what Iíd do if I knew I was only going to get 20 minutes in for that whole day.

Depending on my mood at the time, I might also pick one Jazz tune and work on it, or I might sight read some Jazz heads or classical flute music for 20 minutes.
Every noble work is at first impossible.

Offline The Lone Harper

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Tributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 487
  • New Chromatic Player
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2018, 07:46:13 AM »
Learn some harmonica test pieces such as Pete Pedersen's 'Pictures Of A Woman' that were intended to cover almost everything you can do on a chromatic along with posing a degree of difficulty. Once a player has pieces like that down pat they can run through them quite quickly and cover a wide range of techniques in the process. Another good piece is Tommy Reilly's 'Serenade'.

Where can one obtain the sheet music for these pieces?

Here's a link for Picture Of A Woman:

https://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/pictures-of-a-woman-sheet-music/16537739

Sadly I'm not aware of a source for Tommy Reilly's 'Serenade' at this time.
"Hi ho, Silver Concerto! Away!"

Offline jimjams

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Minator
  • ****
  • Posts: 978
  • Every note counts
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2018, 10:46:21 AM »
I suppose youíre going to get a lot of different answers about this based on each personís temperament, character, and goals. If I only have 20 minutes or so to practice, I might play through all 12 major scales to start. I can do that now in roughly 5 minutes. Itís a great warmup for moving across the entire instrument, dealing with good embouchure and tone in every octave, moving cleanly from note to note, and getting my mind reconnected with where every note is. I might play through one or more of the Jazz scales (diminished, whole tone, Jazz melodic minor, etc.) to keep them fresh. Finally, Iíd pick one song of the half dozen or so in my current rotation and play through it for fun or maybe work on a section I have trouble with. I really enjoy scales, so itís not torture at all for me to play them. I know Iím locking in a solid foundation that I can draw from when reading or improvising, so the work has a rather large payoff. Anyway, that would be a good 20 minute practice for me that would be fun and productive. This is most likely what Iíd do if I knew I was only going to get 20 minutes in for that whole day.

Depending on my mood at the time, I might also pick one Jazz tune and work on it, or I might sight read some Jazz heads or classical flute music for 20 minutes.
Great approaches! Scales go easier if you play them in time with a drum track.
James
Musical artistry comes via a relentless pursuit of beauty.

Offline ilovedaisies

  • Linda
  • Baby Button Pusher
  • *
  • Posts: 67
  • Member
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2018, 01:59:11 PM »


If I only have 20 minutes or so to practice, I might play through all 12 major scales to start. I can do that now in roughly 5 minutes. Itís a great warmup for moving across the entire instrument, dealing with good embouchure and tone in every octave, moving cleanly from note to note, and getting my mind reconnected with where every note is.

...  I know Iím locking in a solid foundation that I can draw from when reading or improvising, so the work has a rather large payoff.


Thanks, Doug.  Iíd shoot for this goal, too.

Offline Doug

  • Chrome-Minator
  • ***
  • Posts: 502
  • Member
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2018, 04:22:22 PM »


If I only have 20 minutes or so to practice, I might play through all 12 major scales to start. I can do that now in roughly 5 minutes. Itís a great warmup for moving across the entire instrument, dealing with good embouchure and tone in every octave, moving cleanly from note to note, and getting my mind reconnected with where every note is.

...  I know Iím locking in a solid foundation that I can draw from when reading or improvising, so the work has a rather large payoff.


Thanks, Doug.  Iíd shoot for this goal, too.

I know some folks are intimidated by this, but itís really not that hard. When I first started playing, about 2 and a half years ago, it took 30 or more minutes to get through all the scales. I played them slowly making sure my brain recognized the note for each blow or draw. Itís slow and painstaking, but now Iím not scared of any key and sight reading has improved considerbly. This is all foundational practice. In the end, itís all about the music we can make, but it sure helps to have the tools sharp and ready to go.
Every noble work is at first impossible.

Offline Gnarly He Man

  • AKA Gary
  • MonsterMeister
  • ******
  • Posts: 11,221
  • "Different harmonicas for every occasion"
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2018, 04:34:47 PM »
"Antlers in the treetops' by who goosed the moose makes more sense to me.

Yeah, I remember those books
Race to the Outhouse by Willie Makit
Illustrations by Betty Wont

Offline John Broecker

  • Time Traveler (Drummer)
  • MasterMeister
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,399
  • Reggae Musician Bob Marley.
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2018, 06:45:59 PM »
Hello, Jimjams.

I'm experienced with music theory, but lack
practical experience on harmonica techniques.
My playing style would be considered simple and
solid.

So, I'd practice slide chromatic concepts that need
my attention: scales, intervals, interval switching,
embouchures, diaphragm breathing.

JB
Believe it or not: DC Fontana was a Script Editor of Star Trek TV shows & movies; DJ Fontana was Elvis' drummer in the 1st 14 years of Elvis' career.

Offline Explorer

  • Baby Button Pusher
  • *
  • Posts: 65
  • Member
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2018, 07:05:48 PM »
I suppose youíre going to get a lot of different answers about this based on each personís temperament, character, and goals. If I only have 20 minutes or so to practice, I might play through all 12 major scales to start. I can do that now in roughly 5 minutes. Itís a great warmup for moving across the entire instrument, dealing with good embouchure and tone in every octave, moving cleanly from note to note, and getting my mind reconnected with where every note is. I might play through one or more of the Jazz scales (diminished, whole tone, Jazz melodic minor, etc.) to keep them fresh. Finally, Iíd pick one song of the half dozen or so in my current rotation and play through it for fun or maybe work on a section I have trouble with. I really enjoy scales, so itís not torture at all for me to play them. I know Iím locking in a solid foundation that I can draw from when reading or improvising, so the work has a rather large payoff. Anyway, that would be a good 20 minute practice for me that would be fun and productive. This is most likely what Iíd do if I knew I was only going to get 20 minutes in for that whole day.

Depending on my mood at the time, I might also pick one Jazz tune and work on it, or I might sight read some Jazz heads or classical flute music for 20 minutes.
Great approaches! Scales go easier if you play them in time with a drum track.
Modern metronomes are great. There are also very interesting videos on advanced metronome practice, using metronomes in unconventional yet interesting ways which stretch one as a musician.

Offline Scotty

  • PRESIDENT'S CLUB
  • MonsterMeister
  • *
  • Posts: 5,583
  • Elizabeth (Scotty)
    • Myspace.com/elizabethgs
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2018, 04:50:45 AM »
You only have 20 minutes of practice time available. What do you do?


Put on my favourite music to play to and just JAM! --it's fun, keeps me up and moving (because I usually dance along), increases my accuracy,
hones my ear if I switch to a radio station where I'm choosing songs at random and above all isn't remotely boring. But then, I'm purely an ear
 player and not at all interested in all of the other 'practice' methods. ;)

Elizabeth (scotty)

Offline Scotty

  • PRESIDENT'S CLUB
  • MonsterMeister
  • *
  • Posts: 5,583
  • Elizabeth (Scotty)
    • Myspace.com/elizabethgs
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2018, 04:54:03 AM »
While I will allow as how this piece is extremely difficult. I see the name as being a misnomer. A joke in fact. The name, not the piece. And whomsoever wrote it was trying to show all the things that could be done? with a chromo. So for that I give some latitude. 

BUT, this name is anything BUT resembling ANYthing like a woman. A woman is soft, smooth, they're the perfect shape Even a bit heavy or a bit light. They smell good. Even when they perspire. Their voice is softer, sweeter, more reserved. They are like living breathing angels. This piece is more like squirrels chasing each other through the treetops. All those squeeky chattering sounds. All that running all over the place. Notes bickering with each other. Jeez where did someone think that this name was proper. It's an insult.

'Antlers in the treetops' by who goosed the moose makes more sense to me. Just a personal feeling that I have held in for years. Time for me to be honest.

smo-joe

Now THAT was good --and funny as all get out.  ;D

Elizabeth (scotty)
PS: just a thought --perhaps it was a 'picture of a woman' he didn't like much?  ;D

Offline jimjams

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Minator
  • ****
  • Posts: 978
  • Every note counts
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2018, 01:23:51 PM »
You only have 20 minutes of practice time available. What do you do?


Put on my favourite music to play to and just JAM! --it's fun, keeps me up and moving (because I usually dance along), increases my accuracy,
hones my ear if I switch to a radio station where I'm choosing songs at random and above all isn't remotely boring. But then, I'm purely an ear
 player and not at all interested in all of the other 'practice' methods. ;)

Elizabeth (scotty)

Love this approach (I believe Age uses it.) when practice is fun motivation is easy.
James
Musical artistry comes via a relentless pursuit of beauty.

Online smojoe

  • MasterMeister
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,515
  • virgo
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2018, 03:46:07 PM »

Now THAT was good --and funny as all get out.  ;D

Elizabeth (scotty)
PS: just a thought --perhaps it was a 'picture of a woman' he didn't like much?  ;D

Well he wasn't married. So there's that. :)
smo-joe

Offline jimjams

  • V.I.P
  • Chrome-Minator
  • ****
  • Posts: 978
  • Every note counts
Re: Condensed Practice
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2018, 11:55:00 PM »
Hello, Jimjams.

I'm experienced with music theory, but lack
practical experience on harmonica techniques.
My playing style would be considered simple and
solid.

So, I'd practice slide chromatic concepts that need
my attention: scales, intervals, interval switching,
embouchures, diaphragm breathing.

JB

Thanks John. I often ignore what ďneeds my attention.Ē Focusing on that makes for good time management.
James
Musical artistry comes via a relentless pursuit of beauty.